40 Pounds of Hope

Have you ever looked at a physical object from your past and feel like you’ve been teleported to the moment you first saw it? I truly believe this feeling is the only form of time traveling I will ever experience during my lifetime. Whether these objects remind us of good or bad times, they all help show us how those moments in our lives have shaped us into the person we are today.

My Dad has a Rawlings Mark McGwire MAC300 youth baseball bat sitting on the side of his bed in case someone ever tries to enter our house unwelcome. It’s the first bat my parents bought me as a child and every time I see it I just remember my dad handing it to me and telling me to be careful when I’m practicing in the backyard.

A couple of days after I received my new bat,  some kids from our neighborhood came over to play whiffle ball. We used a plastic bat and plastic ball while we pretended to be playing under the lights of Chavez Ravine, home of the Los Angeles Dodgers. After a hard-fought 18 inning thriller, the Dodgers beat the Giants 18-12. As my neighborhood friends left one by one, I decided to take some practice swings with my new bat. Everyone was gone at this point, so I thought what’s the worst i can do.

Unbeknownst to me one of my friends left his glove at my house. It so happened to be on the ground about a foot behind me. I never heard him come through the side gate, but I did hear him crying on the floor when I connected my bat to the top of his forehead from my back swing. Our friendship didn’t last long after that, at least the bat did!

The bat is only one example of these physical objects in my life. Most recently I’ve been looking back on all the souvenirs I collected and all the photos I took during Ride for Water this summer. I’ve been getting pretty sentimental as the remaining days of our campaign has reached 6 and  we’re still trying to raise $10,000. There was one object from our journey which transported me back to the day I committed to take part in this campaign and took me on a journey all the way to the day we walked out of charity: water’s headquarters in NYC.

jerrycanThis object is known as a Jerry Can. It’s the yellow gasoline jug I’m hoisting on my shoulder in the picture above, it’s the symbol of the charity we partnered with and it’s the way most developing countries transport and store their drinking water. Every day of our trip I would walk to the nearest water hose and fill up our personal can. I would stare down at our at our bright yellow Jerry and see a problem with our world. I would see the women and children who take on the responsibility to carry the 40 lb jug from the nearest water source back to their homes. I would think of all the possibilities families would have if they didn’t spend most of their day collecting water. Not to mention the water they collect often contains diseases which leads to sickness and death.

For most of our trip when I looked at the Jerry Can, I would see a crisis, but God has a way of turning something negative in this world and making it into something beautiful. Now when I see a Jerry Can I see 40lbs of hope. I see an object that portrays a world where everyone has access to clean water in or just outside their homes. I see a charity organization which empowers all types of people to make a difference. Most importantly I see YOU! Yes you. I see you reading this blog post and being presented with an opportunity to change someone’s life forever.

We only have 6 days left in our fundraising campaign and all im asking is for you to consider giving $5 dollars each day for our final week. Your willingness to donate each day would amount to a total of $30 and would give 1 person clean water for the rest of their life. It’s up to you on what you’ll see when you look at a Jerry Can.  I’m inviting you to see the beauty in it and believe me, it’s an amazing view.

Cheers,

Emilio

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